Democracy of Business

The Democracy of Your Business

It’s election week and the topic of democracy this electoral season has been a hot one to say the least! While we’ve all probably thought about what it means to be a democracy as a nation, have you ever asked yourself what it means to be a democracy as a business? What might that look like?

Coming Together

By definition, a democracy is control of an organization by the majority of its members. While we wouldn’t suggest suddenly introducing an electoral vote for your company leadership, we would recommend looking at “control” as the ability for your members (a.k.a. staff) to work seamlessly together. As The Beatles so eloquently put it in their 1969 Abbey Road hit, we’ve got to “Come Together.” Too often, organizations – and subsequently their data – are siloed. McKinsey found nearly 80% of senior executives surveyed in a 2005 study said that effective coordination across product, functional, and geographic lines was crucial for growth. Yet, only 25% described their organizations as “effective” at sharing knowledge across boundaries.

Departmental silos are a growing pain for businesses of all sizes. The burden often lies with the executive leaders and management to foster a democratic environment to help their teams break down these business barriers that prevent growth.

Understand Their Experience

To do this effectively, organizational leaders must first look at the employee experience. What does it take to get it done?

When it comes to complex sales organizations, a sale can cross several job functions during its sales cycle. While there’s much discussion on the customer’s experience during that journey, there’s little-to-none about the impact internally. Sadly, when asked what gets in the way of work the most, 59% of workers said wasteful meetings followed by excessive emails at 43% (Workfront 2016 Survey). Many office environments have become dependent upon status update meetings and CC/ forwarded emails to share customer information and keep their siloed teams in-the-know.

Data Access for All

Technology can be a solution to reducing meetings and emails. However, with the per-seat license fees and lack of complete data traditionally associated with the CRM and other SaaS solutions, it can quickly become challenging and costly to fully democratize your data.

To truly create a democratic business, you must practice the principles of social equality. Why shouldn’t accounting have access to the same relevant data your sales team has on a customer? Democratizing data means making it accessible to everyone.

At SalesWise, this is what we do best. We believe in creating greater transparency and in helping teams to work more intelligently with 3X the visibility of what’s going on. Reducing email by 30% on average with our customers, we believe in empowering your sales and non-sales teams to simplify the process and shorten the overall sales cycle. Seamless communications and data access enables your business to work as a democracy. Not just for the benefit of your customers, but for your internal teams too.

To learn more about SalesWise, visit http://www.saleswise.com/the-platform/.

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  1. […] necessary to bridge this gap between your sales and non-sales team members. We wrote about this democratic process recently as we describe the importance of making data accessible to all. In doing so, you create […]

  2. […] week, we wrote about democratizing your data and making it accessible to professionals across your organization. This access allows for greater […]

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